Updates after more though on a couple of of the TODO items.
authorCameron Dale <camrdale@gmail.com>
Sat, 19 Jan 2008 01:45:34 +0000 (17:45 -0800)
committerCameron Dale <camrdale@gmail.com>
Sat, 19 Jan 2008 01:45:34 +0000 (17:45 -0800)
TODO

diff --git a/TODO b/TODO
index 2be63a6..2ff301a 100644 (file)
--- a/TODO
+++ b/TODO
@@ -15,21 +15,14 @@ distributions. They need to either be ignored, or dealt with properly by
 adding them to the tracking done by the AptPackages module.
 
 
-Hashes need to be sent with requests for some files.
+Change file identifier from path to hash.
 
-Some files can change without changing the file name, since the file was 
+Some files can change without changing the path, since the file was 
 added to the DHT by the peer. Examples are Release, Packages.gz, and 
-Sources.bz2. For files like this (and only for files like this), the 
-request to download from the peer should include the downloader's 
-expected hash for the file as a new HTTP header. If the file is found, 
-the cached hash for the file will be used to determine whether the 
-request is for the same file as is currently available, and a special 
-HTTP response can be sent if it is not (i.e. not a 404).
-
-Alternatively, consider sharing the files by hash instead of by 
-directory. Then the request would be for
-http://127.3.45.9:9977/<urlencodedHash>, and it would always work. This 
-would require a database lookup for every request.
+Sources.bz2. This would cause problems when requesting these files by 
+path. Instead, share the files by hash, then the request would be for 
+http://127.3.45.9:9977/~<urlencodedHash>, and it would always work. This 
+will require a database lookup for every request.
 
 
 PeerManager needs to download large files from multiple peers.
@@ -59,26 +52,29 @@ first piece, in which case it is downloaded from a 3rd peer, with
 consensus revealing the misbehaving peer.
 
 
-Consider storing torrent-like strings in the DHT.
+Store and share torrent-like strings for large files.
 
-Instead of only storing the file download location (which would still be 
+In addition to storing the file download location (which would still be 
 used for small files), a bencoded dictionary containing the peer's 
 hashes of the individual pieces could be stored for the larger files 
-(20% of all the files are larger than 512 KB ). This dictionary would 
-have the download location, a list of the piece sizes, and a list of the 
-piece hashes (bittorrent uses a single string of length 20*#pieces, but 
-for general non-sha1 case a list is needed).
-
-These piece hashes could be compared ahead of time to determine which 
-peers have the same piece hashes (they all should), and then used during 
-the download to verify the downloaded pieces.
-
-Alternatively, the peers could store the torrent-like string for large 
-files separately, and only contain a reference to it in their stored 
-value for the hash of the file. The reference would be a hash of the 
-bencoded dictionary, and a lookup of that hash in the DHT would give the 
-torrent-like string. (A 100 MB file would result in 200 hashes, which 
-would create a bencoded dictionary larger than 6000 bytes.)
+(20% of all the files are larger than 512 KB). This dictionary would 
+have the normal piece size, the hash length, and a string containing the 
+piece hashes of length <hash length>*<#pieces>. These piece hashes could 
+be compared ahead of time to determine which peers have the same piece 
+hashes (they all should), and then used during the download to verify 
+the downloaded pieces.
+
+For very large files (5 or more pieces), the torrent strings are too 
+long to store in the DHT and retrieve (a single UDP packet should be 
+less than 1472 bytes to avoid fragmentation). Instead, the peers should 
+store the torrent-like string for large files separately, and only 
+contain a reference to it in their stored value for the hash of the 
+file. The reference would be a hash of the bencoded dictionary. If the 
+torrent-like string is short enough to store in the DHT (i.e. less than 
+1472 bytes, or about 70 pieces for the SHA1 hash), then a 
+lookup of that hash in the DHT would give the torrent-like string. 
+Otherwise, a request to the peer for the hash (just like files are 
+downloaded), should return the bencoded torrent-like string.
 
 
 PeerManager needs to track peers' properties.